Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Title, Contents, Author's Note

CONSUMING BROKEN GLASS:
A MEMOIR OF THE LATER DAYS OF TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
BY
SCOTT KENAN
 For my Allean Hale,
Williams scholar, extraordinaire!

All good art is an indiscretion.
Tennessee Williams



Table of Contents


Author’s Note
Prologue
1. Meeting Tennessee
2. Employment
3. To New York
4. A Birthday Party
5. Old Friends
6. Cape May
7. Dinner at Seven-Thirty
8. The Gauntlet and the Honors
9. At Home
10. An Inspiration
11. Meeting Texas Kate
12. Persistence and Pluck
13. Cold Canyons
14. For Comfort
15. Sprucing Up
 16. Christmas and the Real World
17. Edmund Blows In
18. Clearing the Air
19. A New Order
20. Two Movies and a Haircut
21. Au Naturel
22. In the Pursuit of Youth
23. An Uptown Soiree
24. A Public Reading
25. New Orleans
26. The Goodman Stands Firm
27. A Scare, a Dare, and the Preview
28. A House Not Meant to Stand
Epilogue
Acknowledgments



Author's Note


While writing Walking on Glass, I relied on notes I had written or taped during and immediately after the time I worked for Mr. Williams, saved memorabilia, and, of course, my memory. Although I read several Williams biographies and memoirs years ago, at the time they were published, I did not want them to color my memory. While writing this book, I did not read or consult any biographies, except to verify a few dates and spellings.
Much of the dialogue in the book is verbatim, especially when I quote Tennessee’s opinions on matters of art, politics, and known people. That said, I should make clear that his opinions changed constantly—often radically—and I do not mean to imply that those expressed here were his final or even predominant opinions. Whether he said things to me in truth or frustration, these are simply the opinions he expressed to me.
            I am not a scholar, and my purpose was not to write a book for scholars. In the hope of giving insight into the later days of Tennessee Williams, the characters he attracted into his life, and the atmosphere of that time, I sought to recreate my experience without varnishing the story. Memory is my primary source, so necessarily my book is highly subjective.
            The names and identities of a few people have been changed.
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